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Reading: Content or Process as Approaches to Technology Curriculum: Does It Matter Come Monday Morning?

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Content or Process as Approaches to Technology Curriculum: Does It Matter Come Monday Morning?

Author:

Theodore Lewis

University of Minnesota, US
About Theodore
A Professor in Industrial Education, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota, St. Paul.
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Abstract

Content, which focuses upon conceptual structure, and process, which focuses upon intellectual skills, are two preeminent ways in which technology educators conceive of curriculum (e.g., Bensen 1988). Clearly, if technology is to have validity as a school subject, its adherents must be able to say what it is uniquely about. They must be able to answer the basic question, “What do you teach?” And as the subject is taught to children, teachers must likewise be able to say to them and their parents what they will learn, different from in other classrooms. Both content and process claimants may argue, perhaps with justification, that their particular curricular approach reveals technology to students. If it is the case that these two ways of thinking are each capable of helping students acquire literacy in the subject, then perhaps there is need to view them not dichotomously, but rather symbiotically. Perhaps, then, the approach to curriculum does not really matter. Maybe it is how this all plays out in actual classrooms that counts. Still, content and process have their own particular champions, and a divergent discourse along these two distinct lines can be traced.

How to Cite: Lewis, T. (1999). Content or Process as Approaches to Technology Curriculum: Does It Matter Come Monday Morning?. Journal of Technology Education, 11(1), 45–59. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v11i1.a.4
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Published on 22 Sep 1999.
Peer Reviewed

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