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Reading: Partnership-Centered Learning: The Case For Pedagogic Balance In Technology Education.

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Partnership-Centered Learning: The Case For Pedagogic Balance In Technology Education.

Author:

Brad Wamsley

Griffith University, AU
About Brad

The Centre for Technology Education Research, School of Vocational, Technology and Arts Education, Mt. Gravatt Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia.

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Abstract

In many parts of the world, technology education is a subject area in transition (Eggleston, 1992; Fritz, 1996; Lauda, 1988; Wicklein, 1993). This has, and continues to be the case in countries such as America (Newberry, 2001; Sanders, 2001), the United Kingdom (McCormick, 1997) and Australia (Fritz, 1996). In each of these aforementioned countries, various modifications to standards statements (ITEA 2000), curriculum documents (QCA, 1999), and technology syllabi (QSA, 2002a; QSCC, 2000) are currently being drafted and redrafted. Curriculum reform in technology education seeks to modify the workshop-based industrial arts tendency to focus on industrial hand and machine skills (Young-Hawkins & Mouzes, 1991) to a focus more concerned with critical and creative higher-order thinking skills (Lee, 1996). These types of technology subjects are designed to respond to societal changes, such as those evident in many of the world’s current post-industrial technological societies (Lauda, 1988).
How to Cite: Wamsley, B. (2003). Partnership-Centered Learning: The Case For Pedagogic Balance In Technology Education.. Journal of Technology Education, 14(2), 56–69. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v14i2.a.5
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Published on 22 Mar 2003.
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