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Reading: Effects of Modular Technology Education on Junior High Students’ Achievement Scores

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Effects of Modular Technology Education on Junior High Students’ Achievement Scores

Authors:

Cory Culbertson ,

Illinois State University, US
About Cory

A Faculty Associate in the Department of Technology, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

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Michael Daugherty,

Illinois State University, US
About Michael

A Professor in the Department of Technology, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

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Chris Merrill

Illinois State University, US
About Chris
An Assistant Professor in the Department of Technology, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.
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Abstract

In the quest to improve public schools, an education in basic technological concepts and systems, or “technological literacy,” has been viewed as an important part of a school curriculum (Dugger & Yung, 1995, pp. 7-8). Proponents of technology education have claimed that technological knowledge may be critical to the future needs of all students in the United States. However, proponents of technology education have gone beyond technological literacy to cite even greater benefits for students educated in technology. Many technology educators have claimed that instruction in technological concepts is crucial in fully understanding the concepts in other academic subjects, particularly science and mathematics. These educators have argued that technology education allows students to apply the information that is received in other subjects to real-world situations, thereby increasing their comprehension of the subject matter (Dugger & Yung, 1995; LaPorte & Sanders, 1995; Lewis, 1999; Moss 1999). They also claim that technology education helps students to build and reinforce new patterns of knowledge that make better use of the information that is received in the classroom (Loepp, 1999). Repeatedly, experts in the technology education field have argued that technology education has the ability to strengthen students' achievement in other subjects by providing realistic and practical situations in which students can apply science, mathematics, and other skills. Some commercial curriculum vendors have adopted this argument as well, asserting that a given curriculum will help to boost student performance in mathematics, science, reading, or other areas. As high-stakes testing in basic skills continues to be implemented, it can be expected that educators and administrators will look more closely at any curriculum claiming achievement gains in core academic subjects. Technology education, then, may come under increased scrutiny for its purported benefits to core academic subjects.
How to Cite: Culbertson, C., Daugherty, M., & Merrill, C. (2011). Effects of Modular Technology Education on Junior High Students’ Achievement Scores. Journal of Technology Education, 16(1), 7–20. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v16i1.a.1
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Published on 22 Sep 2011.
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