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Have We Made Progress? Stakeholder Perceptions of Technology Education in Public Secondary Education in the United States

Authors:

Michael D. Wright ,

University of Central Missouri, US
About Michael
Professor and Dean of the College of Education at University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg.
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Barton A. Washer,

University of Central Missouri, US
About Barton
Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator in the Department of Career and Technology Education.
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Larae Watkins,

University of Central Missouri, US
About Larae
Coordinator, Research and Curriculum, in the Missouri Center for Career Education at the University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg.
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Donald G. Scott

University of Central Missouri, US
About Donald

Coordinator, Research and Curriculum, in the Missouri Center for Career Education at the University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg.

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Abstract

Technology education (TE) professionals have debated the role and
purpose of technology education and its predecessors in public education for more than a half century (Akmal, Oaks, & Barker, 2002; Erekson & Shumway, 2006; Sanders, 2001), or perhaps, since its inception. In addition, these professionals have struggled with the “image” and perceptionthat key stakeholders have of the field (Wicklein & Hill, 1996; Benson, 1993; Daugherty & Wicklein, 1993). Many developments have occurred during the past two decades to help clarify these issues such asthe name change from the American Industrial Arts Association to the International Technology Education Association (ITEA) (Streichler, 1985), the Conceptual Framework for the Study of Technology (Savage & Sterry, 1990), the establishment of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching Technology and Science (CATTS) in 1998 as the professional development arm of the International Technology Education Association (ITEA, 2008), the Rationale and Structure for the Study of Technology (1996), the Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (ITEA, 2000), Technically Speaking (Pearson & Young, 2002), and related Standards Addendums (ITEA, 2002)].

How to Cite: Wright, M. D., Washer, B. A., Watkins, L., & Scott, D. G. (2008). Have We Made Progress? Stakeholder Perceptions of Technology Education in Public Secondary Education in the United States. Journal of Technology Education, 20(1), 78–93. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v20i1.a.6
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Published on 22 Sep 2008.
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