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Reading: Middle School Children’s Thinking in Technology Education: A Review of Literature

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Middle School Children’s Thinking in Technology Education: A Review of Literature

Authors:

Thomas M. Sherman ,

Virginia Tech, US
About Thomas

Professor of Educational Psychology at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg. 

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Mark Sanders,

Virginia Tech, US
About Mark
Professor of Technology Education at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg.
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Hyuksoo Kwon,

Virginia Tech, US
About Hyuksoo

A graduate student in the Integrative STEM Education program in the School of Education at Virginia Tech.

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James Pemberidge

Virginia Tech, US
About James

A graduate student in the Integrative STEM Education program in the School of Education at Virginia Tech.

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Abstract

We began a project to understand what happens in middle school technology education classrooms in 2006 (Sanders, Sherman, Carlson, Kwon, 2007) in order to document the goals that technology education teachers pursue, the instructional strategies they use to teach children to meet these outcomes, the measures they use to assess achievement of these goals, and the learning actions that they believe students must engage to master their goals. We chose to focus on middle school because it is the school age when most children are introduced to organized, formal technology education curricula. In addition, middle school is often considered the time to begin focusing on influencing thinking with goals such as “teaching problem solving” (Sanders, 2001; Sanders, Sherman, Carlson, & Kwon, 2006). We believe it is important to understand middle school children’s thinking in order to develop appropriate curriculum, to organize and deliver effective teaching, and to ensure that the goals established by the profession are pursued within the developmental abilities of middle school age children. Of course, understanding how children of all ages think and how they learn to use their intellectual abilities well is important. Our choice to limit our initial investigations to middle school was based on the idea that this is an especially fecund developmental period that may be a gateway for many students to begin developing the sophisticated thinking associated with problem solving and to decide to pursue further studies in technology education.
How to Cite: Sherman, T. M., Sanders, M., Kwon, H., & Pemberidge, J. (2009). Middle School Children’s Thinking in Technology Education: A Review of Literature. Journal of Technology Education, 21(1), 60–71. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v21i1.a.4
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Published on 22 Sep 2009.
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