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Reading: Effects of Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Tests on Delayed Retention Learning

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Effects of Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Tests on Delayed Retention Learning

Author:

William J. Haynie, III

North Carolina State University, US
About William
An Associate Professor in the Department of Occupational Education, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
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Abstract

This research investigated the value of short-answer in-class tests as learning aids. Undergraduate students (n=187) in 9 technology education classes were given information booklets concerning “high-tech” materials without additional instruction. The control group was not tested initially. Students in the experimental groups were either given a multiple-choice or a short-answer in-class test when they returned the booklets. All groups were tested for delayed retention three weeks later. The delayed retention test included subtests of previously tested and new information. Both short answer and multiple-choice tests were more effective than no test in promoting delayed retention learning. No difference was found between short-answer and multiple-choice tests as learning aids on the subtest of information which had not been tested on the initial tests, however, multiple-choice tests were more effective in promotion of retention learning of the information actually contained in the immediate posttests.

How to Cite: Haynie, III, W. J. (1994). Effects of Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Tests on Delayed Retention Learning. Journal of Technology Education, 6(1), 32–44. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v6i1.a.3
Published on 22 Sep 1994.
Peer Reviewed

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