Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Industrial Arts/Technology Education as a Social Study: The Original Intent?

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Research

Industrial Arts/Technology Education as a Social Study: The Original Intent?

Author:

Patrick N. Foster

University of Missouri, US
About Patrick

A graduate student in Technology and Industry Education, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

X close

Abstract

It is not difficult to provide considerable support for the contention that as a general-education subject, industrial arts had its start at Teachers College, Columbia University (Feirer & Lindbeck, 1961; Towers, Lux & Ray, 1966; McPherson, 1978). The term industrial arts (as a replacement for manual arts) was proposed by Teachers College professor Richards (Bawden, 1950; Smith, 1981); the “first...and only” definition of the subject was written by faculty members Bonser and Mossman (Brown, 1977, p. 2) in their book Industrial Arts for Elementary Schools; and the social-industrial theory of industrial arts was developed at Teachers College by Bonser and College Dean Russell (Snedden & Warner, 1927).
How to Cite: Foster, P. N. (1995). Industrial Arts/Technology Education as a Social Study: The Original Intent?. Journal of Technology Education, 6(2), 4–18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jte.v6i2.a.1
Published on 22 Mar 1995.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)